Politics, UK

Britain dutifully bows down to the ruling elite.

Left in New Zealand

Congratulations to the people of ‘Great’ Britain for voting the ruling elite into power yet again. You certainly do know your place. Now they have a mandate to treat people with disdain and contempt, for the next five years. I always thought people in the US were dumb, but there is a new kid on the block vying for the title. How can a party offering no credible policies, with a history of inflicting misery on millions, with a leader who hides in a fridge when things get mildly difficult remain in power. I could glibly say you get what you deserve, but that would be grossly unfair to the millions who can see through this charade of thinly veiled fascism.

It would appear that many people from where I grew up in the north have had a lobotomy, believing all that the billionaire controlled media had to say pre-election…

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Labour, Politics, UK

Few thoughts following 2019 General Election results

It has been a month since the disastrous election results came out on Friday the 13th December, a true day of horror that will haunt the UK for at least another five years. The loss hurt more this time because, after the encouraging results of 2017 GE, one would have expected Labour to go further. This was followed by a revolutionary manifesto. They had the youth voters, or the “youthquake” how they invented the term in the polling day. On Thursday as the news poured in on the social media that people queued up since morning to vote, the hopes soared. People were voting for a change then! They were indeed, but for a change that was unthinkable. First time in many years, at times in a century, the Labour seats were wiped out even at their safest heartlands. The euphoria that built up during the day, quickly evaporated at the pace of a burst balloon, when the exit poll showed the Tory landslide. There was no doubt that the predictions are not going to be far off, but there was a slither of hope that the marginal seats may swing to Labour. They didn’t.

It’s hard to explain how the next few days went. On the personal front, the Christmas was coming, my daughters were excited about the prospect, we were going away for a few days, and we were looking forward to spending a longer Christmas break this year. In the middle of all this excitement, the results left a big hollow inside me. I could not stop thinking about the results, could not think about the betrayal of the voters who would be the worst hit by the Tory austerity policies, I could not feel more angry about the media that brainwashed the gullible voters of an imaginary enemy, and I felt angry about Labour for not doing enough to convince people of the dangers of a Tory government. I looked up at various Labour member forums and the feeling was about the same across the board. Some started to smell a rat how postal vote counts were all messed up, how Laura Kuenssberg almost gave away that postal votes showed a Tory lead…but it was clear that no judicial steps would be taken. When it failed to nail the criminals spewing misinformation during Brexit campaign, these petty postal votes would not have mattered much to guarantee a thorough investigation. This post is mainly about the thoughts that were going through in my mind as the aftermath of Labour’s worst defeat in recent years.

First, I thought why on earth Labour agreed for the election before Christmas. I think I knew the answer straight away. The opposition in the parliament already had a strong position in the cabinet regarding Brexit debate. Labour probably thought if they can increase their seats, it will make it even difficult for Boris Johnson to get a deal with the EU. So I can anticipate that many inside Labour wanted Jeremy Corbyn to give in to the calls for a general election, possibly from the activist factions. It didn’t help the situation by the Libdem aka the Remain party, who expected all remainers will be voting for them. On the other side, the xenophobic and racists had already colluded so their votes don’t split. But on the progressive front, the disagreements continued that cost many seats in the end. It is commonplace on the left spectrum of politics, in the UK, in France, in the US — the left doesn’t come to a common ground and compromise on their principles. This was apparent in the Labour manifesto. Despite knowing how it will be accepted in the right-wing media that feeds the brain-fodder to the British electorate, Labour did not compromise on its offering. Nor did they run a campaign of fear and lies, as did the Tory campaign, led by the brash idiot. So, that would be something to take away from this campaign — a clean campaign and a brilliant and groundbreaking manifesto, only to be overshadowed by Brexit.

But thinking about the future was even more painful. I wondered if Labour would win any future election or will turn into the role of the main opposition, with a diminishing representation in the cabinet, with lesser influence on the divisive government policies. Part of me just wanted to give up on politics. Especially because during this election period I was involved a lot in the social media campaigns, debates, researches and carefully going through the manifesto of the two major parties to understand the fundamental differences between then. All my efforts were felt to be wasted on a lost cause. Also, the glimmer of hope for a Labour resurgence disappeared with the election results, knowing Jeremy Corbyn will have to go now, which would mean shifting into reverse gear in the socialist agenda for the party. The results were also an eye-opener to understand how deeply divided the country is. Probably it always was, but Brexit brought the division to the surface. And this made me feel resigned knowing the situation is only going to get worse with another five years of Tory government and they’ll use all means to spread their propaganda of fear. I just thought of stop thinking about politics, concentrate on family and life. But I knew the answer already why I won’t do that. I would become one of the millions of indifferent people who think their view doesn’t count. And then regret for years to come that I did nothing.

So that thought was soon changed into anger and a feeling of betrayal. Betrayal of the working class population against a manifesto that put their interest at the heart of it. And more you heard about them, more frustrated you got. Someone voting Tory because they like how Boris Johnson looks! He looks like a pig who has just been jet-washed! Then you have people in the north of England who are saying they wanted Brexit done, so they voted Tory only this time and will go back to Labour. Couldn’t help thinking it was not going to the cinema and deciding on sweet or salty popcorn. As most of the public services are at the breaking point, and poverty and inequality constantly on the rise, that idea seemed laughable and dangerous in equal proportions. I could not believe how gullible someone can be to make such a decision. And I thought for a moment — let them suffer. If they can’t spot the wolf in sheep’s skin, let them suffer and they’ll realise the hard way why on earth they voted in a Tory MP. But that stage of anger only lasted momentarily as I start to question if it was the gullibility of the people or was it desperation that drove them to make such a momentous decision? Perhaps they hoped for a Brexit will end all their misfortune. The vote was driven by desperation to get out of the mess we are in, except for the fact that they chose to rely on a hopeless and heartless party.

Finally, at the third stage, the pragmatism kicked in. Giving up taking part in politics or having an interest in politics was not an option. It’s one of the core principles that define me and I could not simply let go of the hopes I garnered since a long time ago. Turning my back to people who will suffer the most was also not an option. Fortunately or unfortunately my life is at a stage where until something else drastically change our situation, the election results will have little impact on our life. That’s not true for the millions, especially in the deprived north. This will also prolong a Labour recovery because the Tories will attempt to retain those seats irrespective of the Brexit outcomes. So money will be invested in the region from their magical money tree, and people will vote them again by seeing the initiative, which might mean another Tory rule in 2024! What they won’t realise is that the Conservatives’ main agenda is to deprive communities of investments, so they main appear to be investing but will surely take the money back from peoples’ pockets. So what I thought I will be doing, despite sounding cheesy and somewhat plucked from a B-rated film, is not to let the fire that’s burning within be extinguished. A loss is soul destroying but it only makes you resolute. I felt that it was high time to regroup for 2024. And work towards a Labour Party with a united front, a lot more concerned at the perils of people but also more visible, and vocal to debunk the lies and bias in the media.

So come 2020 and it’s business as usual for me now. 2019 is gone, and the era of Corbyn is over. It’s time to move on and choose a Labour leader who would live up to the legacy of Jeremy Corbyn, as well as win back the confidence of the perennial Labour voters who shunned them this time. It’s also time to give up on Brexit and consider that it will happen and ensure that the living conditions of the EU nationals in the UK and the UK citizens in the EU are not in any way compromised in the process. And finally, I would want to see the start of transformation from the grassroots level. It’s about participation in the local communities and interests where the fightback will need to begin, not in the social media or closed-door meetings. With the arrival of 2020, I was finally able to put the horror of the election behind, and feel hopeful that 2024 will be a different story. It will, but if we only start acting on it now.

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Labour, Politics, UK

A synopsis of Labour Manifesto for 2019 GE and a brief guide to Tactical voting

So, I have finally managed to read through the Labour Manifesto for the 2019 General Election. Needless to say that as a supporter for social justice and abolition of inequality, the Labour pledge presents an ideal proposition. There are questions that could be raised, and answers are not available in the document, but the document instills a fresh breath of hope for the voters who have felt stifled during last nine years of austerity, through which, the Tories only managed to double the National Debt. The 107 page long manifesto is divided into five broad categories and numerous sub-categories, and in the sections below, I have extracted a bullet point summary of the salient features for each section. Some sections are longer, but nevertheless, it is evident that the Labour proposal is definitely for the many, not for the few.

Green Industrial Revolution

Economy and Energy

  • One million climate jobs – To Deliver the Green revolution
  • £400bn national transformation fund to invest in meeting climate and environment targets
  • Net zero carbon energy by 2030
  • Zero carbon standard for all new homes
  • Immediately ban fracking permanently
  • Supply arms of big six into public ownership
  • 3% of GDP in R&D towards climate goal

Transport

  • Free bus travel under 25s
  • Reinstate 3000 bus routes – Bring back routes less used and discontinued by private bus operators
  • Railways into public ownership – hope this will make the rail ticket more affordable. Would have been better if this was made free for under 21s
  • End of combustion engines by 2030 – ten years sooner than Tory pledge

Environment

  • Maintain and improve on EU standards of environment regulations
  • New Clean air act with vehicle scrappage scheme and clean air zone
  • £5.6bn for flood defences
  • Net zero carbon food production by 2040

Animal Welfare

  • Prohibit sell of snares and glue traps – people still buy them?!
  • Ban badger cull
  • Campaign internationally to end commercial whaling
  • Ban import of trophies – would have liked to see trophy hunting a criminal offence even if carried out on foreign soil

Rebuild Public services

Funding

  • Reverse corporation tax cuts – to c.26%, level lower than 28% in 2010, but higher than 19% as present. Conservatives shelved the plan to bring it further down to 17% but they will.
  • Crackdown on tax avoidance – would have liked to see a process/proposal how this would be implemented.
  • £150bn social transformation fund to replace, upgrade and expand schools, hospitals, care homes and council houses – A big ask, again, but desperately needed. It would have been needed at the end of austerity, regardless of the party.

NHS

  • End and reverse privatisation
  • Halt sale of NHS land and assets
  • Free hospital parking for patients, visitors and staff
  • GP training for 27 million appointments more – Tories offered 50 million
  • £2bn to modernise hospitals for mental health patients
  • £1bn fund and 4500 more health visitors and school nurses
  • Training bursary for nurses and midwives
  • Establish generic drug company – this is huge! This can eliminate NHS paying high prices for branded medicine to meet the zero prescription charges
  • NHS fully excluded from any international deal
  • Abolish prescription charges in England
  • Support autistic patients in home

National education service

  • Reverse sure start cuts – this is desperately needed for parents since over a 1000 has been shut in last few years.
  • Paid maternity leave to 12 months
  • 2,3,4 year olds 30hr free preschool – this will help working parents to be back to work sooner. presently the provision is means-tested.
  • 150,000 early years staff more incl. SENCO
  • Arts Pupil Premium- to fund arts education to every student
  • Free school meal for all primary children
  • Close tax loopholes for elite schools
  • Free entitlement to training up to level 3
  • Abolish tuition fees for university education and reinstate maintenance grants

Police and Security

  • Re-establish neighbourhood policing
  • Eliminate institutional racial and gender bias
  • Constrain powers of PM to suppress committee reports – as presently Boris Johnson suppressed the publication of the report on influence of Russia in recent UK government
  • Security treaty with EU even if Brexit happens

Justice

  • Break poverty inequality crime triangle
  • Restore prison officer numbers to 2010 levels
  • PFI prisons to back in-house
  • Restore all early legal aids
  • Halt court closures
  • Decriminalise abortion
  • Public enquiry into blacklisting and Grenfell

Communities and Local government

  • Reinstate council spending to 2010 levels
  • Restore high street
  • Stop post office closures and bring Mail in-house
  • Reunite with Post office and create Post bank to fund green initiatives
  • National youth service for access to local work

Fire and rescue

  • 5000+ fire fighters

Digital, culture, media & sport

  • Broadband into public ownership
  • £1bn cultural capital fund for libraries, museums and galleries
  • Free entry to museums – At least they can be made free for under 25s.
  • Free TV license for over 75s
  • Premier league income spent in grassroots
  • Curb gambling ads – help prevent gambling addiction

Tackle Poverty and Inequality

Work

  • Eradicate in work poverty – for families with not enough income to meet the expenses
  • Living wage £10 for all over 16 – not the cop out £10.50 for over 25s
  • Universal basic income pilot – it will be interesting to see the outcome, preferably used on the lowest income areas first
  • Ban zero hour contracts
  • Right to flexible working for all
  • Paternity leave to 4 weeks and increasing statutory pay
  • Introduce statutory bereavement leave
  • 4 new bank holidays – 4 holidays…yay! Selecting the patron Saints’ days possibly an easy win rather than celebrate significant days in British history instead.
  • Eliminate gender pay gap and pay discrimination
  • Ban unpaid internships – why would an intern do all the donkey work without any payment anyway?
  • Remove restrictions on trade unions
  • Repeal trade union act 2016
  • Align UK law in line with ILO
  • Reduce full time working hour to 32 in a decade
  • Ending opt out option for EU working time directive
  • New labour courts
  • Amend companies act – for companies to prioritise long term growth

Women and equalities

  • New Department for women and equalities
  • Close gender gap by 2030
  • Ban dismissal of pregnant women
  • 10 days paid leave for victims of domestic abuse
  • Misogyny will be hate crime
  • Educate about migration and colonialism

Migration

  • Scrap 2014 immigration act
  • End indefinite detention and inhumane condition
  • £20m to survivors of modern slavery
  • Free movement for EU workers
  • End deportation of family members – of people with rights to stay in the UK
  • End minimum income for migrants
  • Safe asylum process

Social Security

  • Scrap universal credit
  • Scrap benefit cap and two child limit
  • Payment 2 weekly, rent direct to landlords
  • End digital only, +5000 advisors
  • Scrap bedroom tax
  • Increase local housing allowance
  • Assessments in house for disabled people
  • No increase in state pension over age of 66

Housing

  • £1bn fire safety fund for fire safety in all high rise council houses
  • More than a million homes by 2030
  • Scrap definition of affordable homes – Definition linked to local incomes
  • Stop social cleansing – All residents offered a new place in the same development
  • Levy on overseas companies buying houses
  • End leasehold properties
  • New minimum standards for renting
  • End rough sleeping
  • National levy on second holiday home

Constitutional issues

  • End hereditary principle of House of Lords
  • Abolish House of Lords – replaced by Senate of Nations and Regions
  • Voting age 16
  • Ban funding from tax avoiders
  • Repeal lobbying act 2014
  • Women access to abortion in NI
  • No hard border in Ireland
  • Scotland £100bn. 120000 homes.

Brexit

  • Brexit 3 months to a deal. Six months to referendum
  • UK wide customs union
  • close alignment with single market
  • Consumers, environment rights to be at least at pace with EU
  • Close cooperation with security arrangements
  • Scrap existing Brexit legislation
  • EU nationals automatic right to stay

A New Internationalism

A New Internationalism

  • Introduce war powers act, no PM can bypass parliament
  • Audit impact of colonialism

Effective Diplomacy

  • Judge led enquiry into torture and secret court
  • Issue formal apology for Jalianwala Bag
  • Stop arms deal with Saudi and Israel
  • Seek justice for breaches of human rights across the world
  • Support two state solution

Defence and Security

  • £100m to UN peacekeeping missions
  • Support Trident – that’s an about turn! Why would one support Trident?

International Solidatity and Social Justice

  • Department for International development
  • support UN process of binding business and human right
  • International climate finance £4bn/year
  • Aid-funded Food Sovereignty Fund for Global South

There are many more policies through which the government proposes to put an end to austerity. A number of financial analyses were run on Labour’s policies and the general view is that it is achievable, but possibly unrealistic on timescale. However, desperate times need desperate actions. The austerity has split the country – not just into North-South divide but the entire society is divided. What’s worrying is the inequality is widening rapidly and for their vested interests, the Tory government is unwilling to stop the austerity.

The increasing pay gap between the richest and poorest areas in the UK, and a comparison with other countries
Source: Economist

Clearly the Labour manifesto touches life of the many and not for the few who usurp the system with the help of their Tory elitist pals. It gives people hope, reinstates faith in the role of the state and shows a way how the government can embrace the climate concerns and the social, economic and political reforms can all pivot around the climate policies. It also shows that governance doesn’t have to be top-down like authoritarian regimes, but a bottom-up approach is equally viable, where local communities and people are given the powers to make the governance happen.

Amid all the euphoria, few things stand out, that is no clear execution plan, with a timeline. I have browsed through the Tory manifesto as well, notwithstanding the fact that most of it will be lies. What I found easily accessible is their costing report, where they show how they propose to fund any additional investments year on year, and how they are planning to earn the revenue. The Labour manifesto showed the revenue at the end of 2023/4 but the division was not presented on yearly basis. However, some additional information was presented in the detail analysis later on, although for most of the readers, that information would go amiss if they are only looking at the summary revenue and expenses sheet. Also, it was curious how both parties show a completely balanced sheet with revenues equal to expenses. Chances of that happening is slim. I would have also liked to see a detailed timeline of when exactly some of the policies will be implemented. Kudos to them for areas where a clear deadline was provided, such as three months to reach a deal with the EU and six months to the new referendum. But it would have been useful to know what else will be happening in first six months, one year, two years…But I guess it’s a difficult ask for an ambitious plan. If you offered tumbleweed, you can come up with elaborate plans to make it look massive, but the opposite is not easy to make it both credible and lucrative to all stakeholders. My final observation is about the recipient of the manifesto document. I know it needs to serve the interests of the complete demographics, but in my view, Labour’s manifesto should be about the unheard voices – the people who are left behind by the Tories with their austerity. Apart from the manifesto, there should have been templates for what the Labor pledge meant for e.g. Nurses, Police, Firefighters, Social workers, Pensioners, Disabled persons, Teachers, EU migrants, single mothers etc. Perhaps there are videos and other resources, but the people who are so hard pressed to make ends meet are not expected to go through the wordy manifesto. Oh and on Page 63, there was a typo “introducenew” with space missing. At least it’s only a space, unlike missing truth or integrity like the Conservative party.

I wouldn’t expand much on the catalogue of lies spewed by the Tories, as this will become a very long post. I would leave at the fact that they lied on the first day of the campaign by publishing a doctored video of Keir Starmer, then they changed their Tweeter handle to FactCheck spreading lies about Labour campaign, then lied about the number of nurses to be recruited…to top it off, the social media ads are 88% lies or at best misleading. If lying was not vile enough, the Tories have ramped up the hate campaign against the immigrants again to blow the Brexit trumpet, holding the EU nationals and other migrants accountable for everything they failed to deliver. The latest of the hateful rhetoric came from the PM himself, where he claimed that he’ll curb the immigration from EU as they treat this country like their own. They stooped even lower to use the death of Jo Cox and Jack Merritt to foment the anti-immigrant hatred. They have been openly criticised by the bereaved families, but the Conservative Party has no shame, so I can imagine the criticisms and appeals to show some integrity have fallen into empty ears. Not that it’s surprising. Note the Tory election campaign leaflet in 1964 at Smethwick, how divisive they can be to retain power. This is happening again – and they still are equally blatant.

Smethwick election campaign leaflet from the Conservative Party, 1964

So, with a fantastic manifesto, my vote goes to Labour. I don’t mind paying additional taxes or taking some extra burden if that brings even one person out of poverty. But what’s needed to bring Labour in power? There are many marginal seats and they hold the key to swing towards a labour victory. Tactical voting does work and it probably bothers the loyal voters of Labour/LibDem/Green to vote another candidate, but this is the last chance to get rid of vile Boris Johnson and his cabinet of liars, thieves and hatemongers. Here is a rough outline of how to vote tactically –

  1. Find if you are in a marginal seat from this Guardian guide
  2. Find the trend in your local area – GE2017, or even the local elections to see which Tory opposition is gaining more support. Be careful if you use the local elections though, because of the appalling turnout.
  3. Use your social sphere to influence opinions of the floating voters. If you canvas, even better.
  4. Join any last minute local events to bolster the confidence of the people who would like to vote tactically but undecided if that will work.
  5. Vote…go out and bloody vote if you can. There is no point suffering another Tory regime when you have the chance to make the change happen.
Some more links regarding analyses on labour manifesto:

1. https://www.ifs.org.uk/uploads/BN271-Labour%27s-nationalisation-policy.pdf
2. https://www.ifs.org.uk/election/2019/article/what-do-the-election-manifestos-mean-for-local-government-funding
3. https://www.ifs.org.uk/election/2019/manifestos
4. https://www.ifs.org.uk/election/2019/article/reducing-in-work-poverty-the-role-of-minimum-wages-and-benefits
5. https://www.ifs.org.uk/election/2019/article/how-high-are-our-taxes-and-where-does-the-money-come-from
6. https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/nov/28/ifs-manifesto-labour-economy-investment
7. https://friendsoftheearth.uk/general-election/election-manifestos-labour-tops-friends-earths-climate-and-nature-league-table
8. http://newingtoncomms.co.uk/analysis-labour-manifesto
9. https://fullfact.org/election-2019/labour-manifesto-2019/
10. https://www.libertyhumanrights.org.uk/our-campaigns/believe-better-society/liberty-analysis-labour-party-manifesto
11. https://www.theguardian.com/business/2019/nov/28/ifs-manifesto-verdict-neither-tories-nor-labour-have-credible-spending-plan?fbclid=IwAR29h2hL_p1p52AYmA7mpmvXzqY4vHrE8ldsm4P9JR265J7PRCEEzPV-0es
12. https://www.instituteforgovernment.org.uk/manifesto-tracker?fbclid=IwAR2FiKAZ4oPu2X8gL-imC2jkK5lgZJeX2o_2EXZQg_jsWaLc5QsAMS_JVkY
13. https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/dec/09/numbers-public-ownership-uk-utilities-nationalisation?CMP=fb_gu&utm_medium=Social&utm_source=Facebook&fbclid=IwAR1jWbWUEjtZKd2IgjbZnfNt6971vCE1QCZd9LwQAAcuiaizvXWwjLwQ5Kw#Echobox=1575909790

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Brexit, Politics, UK

People’s vote march: A few thoughts on why, how and what’s next

I did not go to the people’s vote march on the 20th. I should have. It was a remarkable day, and it would have felt involved being part of the movement I have supported since the catastrophic day of 23rd June 2016, which some refer as the Independence Day of the UK. This post is not about them; they get enough media exposure anyway, through their fucked up mouthpieces — Daily Mail, Daily Express, The Sun — they can carry on their tantrums. This post is about Remainers, and the last straw of hope that the Brexit car crash may be avoided. Few thoughts crowded my mind thinking about the sheer spontaneity of the event.

Brexit reversal will not be undemocratic:

This is reportedly the second largest gathering of people, taking part in a rally. The scale of the gathering reflected the extent of anger and the extent of distrust in government. The Leave campaign has been complicit throughout in baffling the voters who sat in the fence. They broke several electoral law, made false promises that disappeared on the day the results came out. If these factors alone wasn’t good enough to repeal the result of the referendum, as the political parties hid behind the democratic process, the huge turnout does point out that people are genuinely worried about the uncertainty of the outcome and the government hasn’t got a fucking clue either. If the whole scenario is in utter shambles, is running another vote going to be so undemocratic? I saw a great example last Saturday, that British people were once given a choice to name a boat, and the democratically chosen name wasn’t selected and they gave it a different name. And that was a fucking boat, while we are talking about the future of 60 odd million people! If the democracy doesn’t allow its people to reconsider a wrong decision, the word democracy has lost its meaning.

Posted by The Crisis Actor on Wednesday, October 17, 2018

JC—where were you?:

I have been a staunch supporter of you since your name floated as the labour leader prospect. I have even renewed my membership to vote for you during the leadership challenge. However, your involvement, or lack of it, on Labour’s stand on Brexit, is deeply disappointing. I know politics in national level is a lot trickier than student politics, like turning up like a star at Glasto. You need to weigh the party’s stand with voters, unions and the future direction of the party. From a left-wing politics point of view, EU fosters capitalism, which I believe is the main obstacle behind your decision not to go completely against Brexit. EU has its follies but is a much better place to be after the next election when Labour will win than in the post-Brexit UK. If Brexit fails, it would be because of the callousness of the Conservative party, not because of Labour’s stand in it. Thinking beyond the capitalist perspective, the concept of EU is about collaboration amongst the member states, eliminating barriers to businesses and to its citizens, encourage social cohesion across the union. The post-Brexit UK, on the other hand, will replace the supposedly domineering EU with cockroaches like Boris or JRM, who’d undo all that has been achieved in the past four decades of membership. I’m pretty sure your silence is part of a big plan, and Labour is waiting for the moment; but once the deadline is over and we end up in a No-deal Brexit, there is no coming back. By not taking a stand Labour has already allowed too much time to the Tories to regroup and reshuffle. This rally would have been the perfect moment for you to declare that Labour is now aligning itself to the second referendum. Or were you worried that your silence had already caused much animosity from the people who joined the march? Believe me, that’s the less-harder position to be in, rather than looking at the same crowd to vote for you in the next general election. You were the elephant not in the room in the crowd of 700 thousand attendees, and your absence and lack of acknowledgement for the second referendum was deeply missed. There’s time to change, but not a lot of it. Tick…tock…Tick…tock…Tick…tock…

EU—Take notice of the EU solidarity:

What has been noticed since the Brexit negotiations began is the role of the EU. And that’s entirely the fault of the pig-fucker David Cameron government to drag the country into this nightmare. Without any preparation, needless to say, the meetings must have been a delight to the EU negotiators. However, the rhetoric from EU came across as if they want to set the UK as an example, of what happens to the dissidents who dare to undermine the EU. It was not very vitriolic at the beginning, but as it turned out that just like during the time in the union, UK want to pick and choose the clauses and benefits they want to keep while leaving it, the criticisms from European leaders became harsher. Undoubtedly, that bolstered the nationalists in the UK who mainly voted Leave, but it also put a few Remainers off – considering their choice if there was a second referendum. Ultimately, if there is a No-deal Brexit, UK will suffer. But it won’t cease to exist. It will clutch at straws to keep afloat for a while, striking dodgy trade deals with rogue states like USA and Saudi, but after a decade or so, the balance would be found. But that’s the worst case scenario. That has a tremendous cost associated with it. And for that acrimonious split up, there will be a cost to the EU as well. The March showed that the UK has not transformed into an EU-hating, protectionist, nationalist state and there are plenty – probably the majority if the vote was conducted on reality and not on fairytale promises – who stand by the common goals of the EU and want to be referred to as a citizen of the EU, and British and European identities can coexist. These people are fighting their corner, as much as they could, in order not to scupper the future of the millions by the Tory profiteers. They don’t need the word of encouragement from the governments in the EU, but in the war of the words and the bravado between the two sides, let the leaders on EU states not lose sight of these efforts from inside the UK and dissuade the only people who can prevent the huge cost to both sides.

Working-class=Racist, Youth=Remain:

Some very common generalisations were found in the Remain camp since the vote. First one was that the old people cost us the Brexit. That myth was debunked soon after, although some still maintain that view. Perhaps it’s true that the older generations mainly voted Leave, but it’s also true that the number of youth voters was a lot higher who didn’t bother turning up for the vote. Also, they thought that all under 30s who didn’t vote would have voted Remain. I haven’t seen the statistics of the absentee voters, but needless to say that all the youth wouldn’t be from the same social class, they would be from an array of social, cultural, economic background. Considering the fact that even some university students end up as Tory scum, it’s unlikely that the absentee youth alone would have created enough swing in the balance. It would be preposterous to assume that only the uni-goers would vote Remain and the rest wouldn’t. Perhaps the section of the population who have experienced and benefitted from the European integration would be more likely to support the union, and perhaps the percentage is higher amongst the youth who went to uni. But that’s just another stereotyping with no statistical backup. The second one is on race and religion. Brexit vote is ultimately decided on xenophobia. And there are some more cliched stereotypes observed in the last two years. That the white working class is against European free movement. Perhaps that is correct. Perhaps most of them voiced concerns about the influx of skilled and unskilled labour from Europe. Because they were the worst affected segment of the population, at least apparently. Because the migrants were an easy red-herring to deflect criticism from the real perpetrators. There is also a speculation along this line about the disenfranchised north. That basically stems from a higher distribution of the white working class population in the region. However, none of this is entirely true. Looking at the results, rather than north, the decisive results were in the south. Below London, most of the constituencies voted Leave — an area with much less working class and much more middle-class population. So what went in there? Did the class who benefits more from the union turn their face away from it? Why? For more profit? Probably true, considering the same regions are predominantly conservative heartland as well. So the vilification of the white working class may be too unjust, considering the fact that irrespective of their location, they are indeed disenfranchised. On the other hand, since London voted broadly Remain, due to its multicultural character, it’s assumed that a multicultural population would vote for Remain. Again, a generalisation. The main factor was xenophobia of two types — about The unskilled Eastern European labour and about the Muslim refugees from the Middle East and North Africa as well as possible influx Turkish people if they were to be added as a new member. While the Eastern European labourers raised economic concerns to be seen as drain to our resources, mainly by the working class who need the resources the most and they don’t get it, the prospect of the increase in Muslim immigrants touched a nerve for many communities. It was not just economic concerns, but also the cultural, religious and security aspects that turned out to be pivotal. To the sceptics, every Muslim immigrant was seen as a potential terrorist and this view was not only shared by the white Christian population but other communities as well. When you’d think multicultural concentrations would unanimously vote to Remain, such factors played a large role, when the result was decided on a knife’s edge. All this shows is racism, xenophobia is rife in today’s British society and for reasons far greater than Brexit, these inner demons need to be faced and banished.

Note to the liberals — Take to the streets:

The March was an enormous success. It predicted 100,000 attendees, but on the day there were nearly 700,000. It made a bold statement that we are behind a union with the UK in it. A bit too late though. Although the gesture is emphatic, and I’m hopeful that it’ll make an impact on the process to reverse it, but being realistic we are two years too late. Remain voters, including me, have been too complacent about the result. Just as the government brochure that said fuck all. Granted that the Leave campaign was meticulously funded and run by people who are losing out because of the EU legislation, it doesn’t take away the fact that the Remain camp did nothing to persuade many Leave voters who sat on the fence and on the day decide on the toss of a coin. “Someone else will” is the mentality we have seen, and I’m equally critical of myself. Apart from stating to anyone whom I discussed Brexit with that I’ll be voting In, I barely did anything. Apart from curbing the desire to set fire to every Leave poster I came across, knowing who it represented, and what it represented. I think in today’s world, the space for debate is getting squeezed down, and rather than a constructive discussion, we are too keen to say “I’m right and you’re wrong. And that’s the end of it”. Probably because we haven’t got time. Time to think, time to discuss, time to synthesise. Probably the liberals think there’s no point in talking to nationalist idiots. Apart from all other factors why we are here today, it’s us to blame as well. This march should have happened on 20th of June 2016, not on the 20th of October 2018. To show solidarity towards a unified Europe. To show how many people who cared for this issue. To show everyone undecided that there are millions who are on the right side of history. To help them realise that if you want to reform the system, first you have to be a part of it. So next time, maybe in the next general election, let’s not hide behind “someone else will”. Make your voice count as if it was the last time because if you don’t, you’ll be helping UK cave into another disaster. Then there will be no point of arranging another march two years on. Act at the moment, just as the Leavers did.

It’ll be one of my biggest regrets of not doing enough to prevent Brexit. And not going to the march on 20th of October. But I hope there will be another march when Article 50 will be withdrawn. To celebrate over the scheming Brexiters. Now, I won’t miss that!
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Bengali, Cuisine, UK

কেজরী – বিলেতি খিচুড়ি

কেজরী। না না, নাম শুনে ধরে নেবেননা দিল্লির কেজরির কথা বলছি। ওসব আপ ফাপের রাজনীতির ঘেঁষ না ধরে পাতি রান্নাঘরে ঢুকে পড়ুন। তবে এ নামের যা মাহাত্ম্য তাতে রাজনীতির ছোঁয়া বর্জন করা দুষ্কর। রান্নার নাম যেমন বিলিতি, রাঁধার পদ্ধতিও বিলিতি। আর ডালের চিহ্নমাত্র নেই এ পদে তাই খিচুড়ি বললে পাপ হবে। তবে আমাদের রোজকার হেঁশেলের খিচুড়ি কিভাবে কেজরীতে পরিবর্তিত হলো তার হিসেব আমার কাছে ছিলনা। তবে আমার উইকি সব জানে, সে দেখাচ্ছে খিচুড়িই ভারতে আগে প্রচলিত ছিল। সাহেবরা সব সম্পত্তির সাথে সাথে খাবারের রেসিপির ওপরও দখলদারি বসাতে ছাড়েনি। ধরে নেয়া যেতেই পারে ভারত ফেরত কোনো বিলিতি শেফের হাত ধরে খিচুড়ি আঠেরো শতকে পৌঁছে গেছিল সাত সমুদ্র পারে। ইংরেজি ধ্বনিতত্ত্ব এক আজব ব্যাপার, ক দিয়ে শুরুর শব্দগুলো এরা শুরু করে খ উচ্চারণ করে, কিন্তু খ দিয়ে কোনো শব্দ শুরু হলে তা উচ্চারণ করতে লেজে গোবরে অবস্থা। সেভাবেই অনুমান করা যায় খিচুড়ির জগাখিচুড়ি উচ্চারণের থেকে রেহাই পেতে খিচুড়ি পরিণত হলো kedgeree তে।

কাজের কথায় আসি। সেদিন দোকান থেকে কম দামে হ্যাডক মাছ পেয়ে ভাবলাম কদিন আগে খাওয়া এক অপূর্ব ফরাসি মাছের বড়া বানানোর চেষ্টা করবো। তা রেসিপি খুঁজতে গিয়ে হাতে হ্যারিকেন, তাজা মাছ নয়, চাই সল্ট কড জাতীয় শুকনো মাছ, খানিকটা আমাদের শুঁটকির মতো, তবে নুন মাখিয়ে শুকানো বলে তেমন চড়া গন্ধ হয়না। যাক, আবার শূন্য থেকে শুরু করতে হলো রান্নার প্ল্যান। শেষ রক্ষা তো ভাজা মাছ বা জিরে গুঁড়ো দিয়ে ঝোল আছেই। এখানে ব্রেকফাস্ট খেতে গেলে poached haddock পাওয়া যায় তবে বাঙালি হয়ে মাছকে দুধে সেদ্ধ করতে রুচি হলোনা তাই ভাবলাম হ্যাডকের আরেক নামকরা রেসিপি বানানো যাক, কেজরী।

বিলিতি মতে রান্না, তাই রান্নার আদ্ধেক উপকরণ বিলিতি, আবার ভারতের আমদানি খাবার তাই খানিক মসলাপাতি আমাদের রান্নাঘরের মতই। খানিক দোনোমোনার পর বানিয়েই ফেল্লাম কেজরী। আহা তার যা স্বাদ, টেনিদার খট্টাঙ্গ পলান্নর কথা মনে পড়ে গেলো। বেশি বাহানায় না গিয়ে বলেই ফেলি সেই কেজরী তৈরীর উপায়। পরিমান নিয়ে বেশি মাথা ঘামাবেননা, খালি নুনটা বাদ দিয়ে বাকি মসলা অল্প কম বেশি হলে মহাভারত অশুদ্ধ হয়ে যাবেনা। আমি বানিয়েছিলাম দু কাপ চালের সাথে, অন্য পরিমান রান্নার জন্য হিসেব মতো বাকি উপকরণগুলো কমবেশি করতে হবে।

প্রথমে বড় একটা হ্যাডকের ফিলে একটা ফ্রাইং প্যান জাতীয় কিছুতে গরম জলে সেদ্ধ করতে হবে। মাছের ছাল থাকলে ছালের দিকটা নিচের দিকে রাখতে হবে। ৪-৫ মিনিট পর মাছ আঁচ থেকে নামিয়ে জল ঝরিয়ে অল্পক্ষন ঠান্ডা করতে হবে। মাছ ঠান্ডা হয়ে গেলে কাঁটা আর ছাল টা ছাড়িয়ে একটা কাঁটাচামচ দিয়ে ছোট ছোট ফ্লেকে ভেঙে নিন। আর একটা সসপ্যানে ৩-৪ টে ডিম সেদ্ধ করে নিতে হবে। ডিমগুলো হার্ড বয়েল করলেই ভালো। ডিম সেদ্ধ হয়ে গেলে চাকা চাকা টুকরো করে রেখে দিতে হবে। এরপর একটা বড় সসপ্যানে বেশ খানিকটা মাখন দিয়ে একটা বড় পেঁয়াজ কুচি কুচি করে কেটে ভেজে নিতে হবে। পেঁয়াজে যেন বাদামী রঙ না ধরে যায়। ভাজা পেঁয়াজে এরপর ৩-৪ টে গোটা এলাচ, ১-২ টো তেজপাতা, ২ ইঞ্চি লম্বা দারচিনি আর একটু হলুদ গুঁড়ো ওই প্যানের ভেতর দিয়ে আবার খানিক কষাতে হবে। এবার ওই মসলার মধ্যে চাল দিয়ে অল্পক্ষন ভাজতে হবে একদম কম আঁচে। এই ফাঁকে এক লিটার গরম জলে দু-তিন টুকরো ফিশ স্টক গুলে নিন। ফিশ না থাকলে চিকেন স্টক ও চলবে। আর জলের পরিমান কতখানি চাল তার ওপর নির্ভর করবে। চাল বেশি যাতে না সেদ্ধ হয়ে যায় তার জন্যে প্রথমে একটু কম জল দিয়ে রান্না শুরু করাই ভালো। পরে দরকার পড়লে অল্প গরম জল দিতে হতে পারে। যদি ফ্রেশ স্টক বানাতে পারেন তাহলে তো কেল্লা ফতে, তবে আমি কিউব দিয়েই বানিয়েছিলাম, মন্দ হয়নি। এবার ওই ফিশ স্টক চাল আর পেঁয়াজ ভাজার মধ্যে দিয়ে আঁচ বাড়িয়ে দিতে হবে। জল ফুটে উঠলে স্বাদ মতো নূন দিয়ে চালটা ভালো করে নাড়িয়ে দিতে হবে, যাতে তলা না ধরে যায়। এবার ঢাকা দিয়ে আঁচ কমিয়ে ভাত রান্না হতে দিন। মাঝে মধ্যে দেখে নিতে হবে তলা ধরে যাচ্ছে কিনা, ধরলে চাল আবার খানিকটা নাড়িয়ে দিয়ে হবে, আর দরকার পড়লে অল্প গরম জল যোগ করতে পারেন। চাল যখন প্রায় সেদ্ধ হয়ে গেছে, তখন ঢাকনা খুলে মাছ আর ডিমের টুকরোগুলো সেখানে ঢেলে দিয়ে আবার ঢাকনা চাপা দিন। ২-৩ মিনিট পর অনেকটা কুচোনো পার্সলে পাতা দিয়ে দিন ভাতের মধ্যে। আলতো করে ভাত মাছ আর ডিম মিশিয়ে নিয়ে আঁচ বন্ধ করে দিন। কেজরী তৈরী। শেষে তাতে অল্প কুচোনো পার্সলে ছড়িয়ে এক টুকরো লেবুর সাথে পরিবেশন করুন। এদেশে এমনি এমনিই সার্ভ করতে বলে, কিন্তু হাজার হোক খিচুড়ির জাতভাই বলে কথা, সাথে ভাজা কিছু না থাকলে তেমন জমবেনা খাওয়াটা। ভাজা যা ইচ্ছে বানাতে পারেন, নিদেনপক্ষে আমার মত অমলেট হলেও যথেষ্ট।

কেজরী

যদি রান্নার মসলা বা অন্য উপকরণগুলো না পান তাহলেও এই রেসিপিটা রান্না করে দেখতে পারেন। হ্যাডকের জায়গায় যেকোনো সাদা কাঁটাছাড়া মাছ ব্যবহার করতে পারেন। পারলেই না পেলে ধনেপাতা দিয়ে দিন। হলুদের পরিবর্তে জাফরান দিয়েও বানানো যায় তবে সে মশা মারতে কামান দাগার মতো ব্যাপার হবে। আমাদের খিচুড়ির মতো এখানে আলু বা অন্যান্য সবজি দেয়ার কোনো নিয়ম দেখিনি, তবে চেষ্টা করে দেখা যেতেই পারে। নিন এবার ঢুকে পড়ুন হেঁশেলে, আর ব্লগ পড়ে কাজ নেই।

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Labour, Politics, UK

Tories out: A last minute guide for tactical voting

Last year when the UK delivered its shock verdict in EU membership, I was in Normandy. I had already done my bit, I voted IN through postal ballot, did some Facebook canvassing, slagged off and ridiculed the UKIP buffoons and Cameron’s brochure. I thought that was enough to stay in. It was not. The VOTE LEAVE banners stuck on bushes and little bridges seemed to have a louder voice. This year, after a year of drama and pandemonium, we are yet again heading for another election, apparently to a stronger and stable UK. A day after the results, we’ll be on our way to a France again, where the people overwhelmingly voted for a pro-EU leader, shutting down the threat of a protectionist and nationalist regime. Our visit would be quite symbolic, either going in as equals, with a progressive government in the Westminster working to damage control the Brexit outcome. Or going in as laughing stock, with a government still fooling its people with no deal is better than a bad deal, Brexit means Brexit and all other mouthful nonsense. The 8th of June will definitely change the future course of British politics; it’s just waiting to see if that’s for better or worse.

If you survived this far and not pissed off about another remoaner, and you haven’t much time, read this concise guide that gives you much insight about tactical voting. How to vote the Tories out: a newbies’ guide to tactical voting. You don’t need to know the rest unless you’re still undecided, where this might help you decide why you can’t let the Tories another reign.

The biggest dilemma about this election is who to vote. On one side, you have Theresa May and her cronies, constantly changing their stance on every single policy, and already showing the horrors of the Thatcher era politics with cuts on every imaginable public service. And there is another party which shouldn’t even be considered a mainline party after the Brexit vote. UKIP lost its relevance, although unfortunately, the supporter base of the disillusioned working class hasn’t yet moved back to mainstream parties. It’s to see if 2017 will see the obliteration of UKIP like 2015 was for BNP. On the other side of the spectrum, there is Labour. Or Jeremy Corbyn. Like it or not, he is the face of Labour and based on where you are and how old you are, you either like Labour because of him, or you won’t vote Labour because of him. It is undeniable, however, that despite the mass walkout of mainstream Labour politicians, Labour led by Jeremy Corbyn has done very well to cut the Tory lead to a minimum. But surveys aren’t accurate. I’m still apprehensive. Then there is SNP, set to win all their seats with bigger margins after Theresa May quashed the call for a second referendum. At times where Labour was expected to rip the Tory bills and arguments apart, they were surprisingly very reserved, and it was SNP did that job. But they don’t have a manifesto for the entire UK, and while you agree with them, and may form coalitions, their interest will only circle Scottish public, which accounts for only 8% of the population. And about Libdems, seven years after they made the collaboration with the Conservatives, and virtually wiped themselves out of the UK map, their popularity is on the rise again, mainly to urban young voters based on the Brexit renegotiation issue. You have the Green Party as well, but outside Brighton, they only appear to have a niche voter bank, not large enough to swing any seat. And the Women’s equality party. But these parties, although they have a credible agenda, this is not the Election to undercut anti-Tory supports. Who can you trust then? The choice that appears to be available to the general public, not just this time, but for most of the elections, is the best of a bad bunch.

It is hard to support a particular political party these days. This is partly because they moved away from the party hardline and gradually taking a centrist approach. It is quite possible to find that various parties are promising to fulfil your expectations on various sectors, and you end up choosing the party meetings most of them. For the generally capitalist economies, this offers a middle ground for the oppressed middle and lower classes, but from a socialistic point of view, this means that the changes are not drastic enough to ensure that the income gap is decreasing and everybody in the country is offered a minimum level of lifestyle.

The other deterrent of voting is the lack of leadership. Despite all other negatives, Margaret Thatcher was the last credible leader the UK has seen. The PMs after her lacked any kind of leadership. They were suave men, great in appearance and eloquence but that’s how far their skills went. They hardly knew the country or its people outside their boys’ club spheres and failed to understand the challenges and hardships faced by the working class. Outside the PM club, Nick Clegg was one such leader who showed great promise but ended up committing political euthanasia for the Libdems by joining with Tories in 2010. Looking at Theresa May, she often tries to emulate Thatcher but fails miserably. Most of her answers in the PMQ ended up making personal insults to Jeremy Corbyn, or other opposition MPs or members of the public. A leader who shows no respect for the opposition and no empathy for the harsh realities faced by the working class today including most of the public servants, it is unimaginable how people can trust her to be in charge of the country. All she has got is strong words and no actions to follow through. On the other side of the bench, we have Jeremy Corbyn. Much has been said about his appearance and leadership qualities, but over the last two years, he had shown extreme resilience when he had to withstand the challenge from his own party rather than the opposition. Granted he made rushed decisions within the Labour camp, reshuffling shadow cabinet every month or so, but that wasn’t a failure of him, but the Labour MPs who chose to leave the party in tatters rather than stand behind Corbyn. People who think Jeremy Corbyn isn’t the suitable leader, let me remind you the terrible handling of the home office by the now PM, including the UKBA vans and the cuts in the police that is to some extent responsible for the failure to intercept recent terrorist attacks. If her track records prove she is a better leader based on void arguments like enough is enough or Brexit means Brexit, then it begs the question of the legitimacy of such claims.

So, whom to vote for then? Looking at most or all sociopolitical events happening over the last decade, or longer than that, I repeat to myself one simple phrase, “Know your enemy”. The more problems I witness, the more I’m convinced that there are so much hatred and so much tension between humans, and one root cause is that we are always fighting a shadow war with an imaginary opponent but the real perpetrators always get away unharmed. It does sound like a communist manifesto, but wealth is the main underlying factor in most of the crises faced today — austerity, terrorism, tax evasion, immigration — the list is endless. It is like watching the butterfly effect unfurl in front of your own eyes. Considering the vote is not decided by the 1% of the wealthiest people, but the working-class people, the phrase “know your enemy” is actually understanding who they are actually exploited by. The enemy is not the Polish construction worker next door who you think is taking up your jobs, the enemy is not the Muslim neighbourhood that you avoid because it doesn’t feel like Britain there, the enemy is not the disabled person having to prove every week that they are unable to work, nor are the children fleeing their war-torn countries waiting in Calais jungle for yet another dangerous attempt to cross the channel. The enemy is not the EU, taking away billions of pounds from you because you don’t know how much it’s putting back in. The enemy is not the children and people in countries with natural disasters, famine, political unrest because you think all your tax ends up there doing charities. The actual enemy is who led you to believe all these red herrings so you are not disgusted by things that are actually robbing you in the daylight. About protecting the interests of the rich, about making Britain a tax haven, about sending away doctors and nurses who’ve been legitimately working here for years by raising the threshold, by cutting pensions and disability benefits yet funding millions for the clowns in Buckingham palace. You must be disgusted learning how imams tell the Muslim communities whether to vote and for whom to vote? I am. But you don’t see it the same way when the Sun, Daily Mail and The Express urges on its front page who you should be voting for! The media who led you to believe all the trash deliberately, by Rupert Murdoch & co is our enemy. You don’t really need religious hate preachers in this country, but the media is doing exactly that right in front of your nose. The societies are being divided thanks to media scapegoating. Yet, you choose to spend your hard-earned money reading that trash and get agitated that this country is going down. And there are politicians. You’re not disgusted that a PM is saying enough is enough after repeated terrorist attacks, yet she was the person in charge of the home affairs for the last six years, cutting police and surveillance numbers. You are worried about letting Syrian refugees in case they are terrorists, yet you don’t flinch when the picture of May appears with the king of Saudi Arabia. You still know where most of these terrorist outfits get their funding from, don’t you? You just chose to ignore and rather shout for Burqa ban! You see smug Jeremy Hunt smile sheepishly when he’s asked about the chaotic situation in the NHS, Iain Duncan Smith burst out in cheers when a cut is mentioned, we have a buffoon of a foreign secretary that people should be ashamed of allowing representing Britain to other nation. And that the fox hunting would be brought back doesn’t bother you, nor does Theresa May’s warning about throwing out any human rights laws to prevent terrorism, uncannily idiotic and dangerous as the Muslim ban proposed by the orange-faced batshit across the pond. Yet your derision is only directed towards Diane Abbott for getting her figures wrong, and your anger towards Jeremy Corbyn for his supposed IRA link.

So really, you need to think whether you should be more worried about Labour raising tax for people earning more than £80k and the Bolshevik rhetoric suggested by the right-wing media, or issues that have been plaguing the country for much longer? Britain needs a new government, a government that puts its people first and treat all as equals. And a government that draws away from the US-led foreign policy framework about the Middle East and think how the country can constructively contribute to the peace process. Guns didn’t work there, it’s evident now. All it did is bring the enemy home. We need a government that ensures that our public service is protected and public servants are recognised for their amazing service working unreasonable hours for a pittance. You need a government that will ensure Brexit happens with a close tie to Europe, by agreeing on free labour movement so the access is not lost to our biggest market rather than grovelling to counties that are undemocratic. You need a fairer society where the minimum wage lets someone have a decent lifestyle unreliable of the food banks, people who earn more are made to pay more tax, closing loopholes that the Tories have been enjoying sharing with their crony pals. Can Theresa May promise all these? Heck no! Can Labour deliver all this? Heck no, but they made the first move by thinking about it. And they say “You’ve actually failed when you stopped trying”. But more importantly, you need to keep the Tories out. So, look at many tactical voting sites and see if your constituency is marginal. If you’re Libdem and Labour is marginal, your best bet is to vote Labour, rather than allow another closely won conservative seat. And above all, VOTE! Make sure you had your voice heard. I still wait to see the day when it will be liable to fines if you didn’t vote. So turn up and don’t moan later.

Here’s one last word of caution though. If you’re thinking voting Libdem where they are close to winning and Labour is not in contention. Remember 2010, when you were betrayed by them. So, don’t assume that Tim Farron will side with Labour if there’s a hung parliament. But I’d still think if there was alternative voting available, Labour would be the second choice of Libdem supporters than the Tories. And if you voted Libdems, you have a fair chance of a coalition; voting Labour and losing the seat to Tories will mean another seat will have to be won somewhere to compensate. In either case, make your vote count towards making a difference. It’s your choice, for a better tomorrow…or worse. Just remember, “Know your enemy”. All the best to your future.

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Politics, short story, UK

A Remoaner’s Parable for Brexit

A good friend once told me this story:

There was a devout man. He prayed to God every day and thanked him for his existence on earth. He always believed that if he was in any kind of trouble, God will help him out. And so God did. One time when his child had a fever, and he prayed and prayed. The next morning his child was cured completely; he even went to school. Or the other time when he ran into debt and after praying to God, he had the dream and found an untouched scratch card lying inside a book, and he won enough money to clear his debts.

One day our devout man was working in his office. It started to rain heavily around the lunch hour. The people thought the rain would stop soon. But it carried on, and the water started to rise. The banks of the river nearby had burst, and a flash flood followed. There was a TV in the pantry area in the corner. In the middle of share price displays, there was a woman on screen with an angelic face, announcing that everybody should leave the area straight away. Everyone in the office packed their bags and rushed to leave the building. Everyone but our friend. He started praying, so the disaster would stop. Colleagues tried to dissuade him, but he was firm in his belief. His colleagues thought he was mad, but he knew God will help him.

Half an hour went by. The water is gushing inside the building. The devout man is still asking God to put an end to this awful weather. There was a loud honk outside. A rescue truck is rescuing stranded people to take them up to the high ground. Our friend looked out of the window.

“Hey there! Come downstairs, there’s nothing to worry. The water isn’t deep. We got you”
“Thanks, but I’m fine here. God will save us. You should pray as well“
“What nonsense! Come right now, we got other people to rescue and the water is getting higher”
“God will make it all stop. You’ll see. You carry on, help the others“
“You moron!“

And the truck drove away. The man went back to his prayer. Half an hour went by. The ground floor is under waist-deep water. A big siren and flashing lights outside. A fire engine is passing by. It comes to a halt as the fireman noticed the man looking out of the office window.

“Hang in there fella, we’ll get the ladder to you!“
“I don’t need your ladder. The God almighty will soon put an end to this.“
“What a load of rubbish! Get on the ladder now. We can’t stay here long, water will get in the engine“
“You save yourself, my friend. God will save me. He always had in the past“
“Good luck to you on that.“

And the fire engine went away. The man was feeling a bit anxious now. Is God not happy with him? Has he done something wrong? “I promise I will pray more, dear God! It’s just the thoughts about work and family distracted me lately. But I will, once again, be your true servant“. He started praying more feverishly. Half an hour…then an hour went by. It’s getting dark, and there is no sign of the rain to stop. The water has come up to the first floor. Our man went to the roof, so God can save him. “Ah, I see. He probably wasn’t planning to stop the rain. It must be a boat, like Noah’s, that will save me. I know now why God waited for so long. He wanted the water to rise so he can send the ark“. The man suddenly felt that God hadn’t forsaken him, and he was too blind to see it. He watched out for the boat, but was disturbed by a very loud whirring noise again —

A helicopter is circling over the buildings. Our man is suddenly flooded with shining light from the helicopter. They lowered the rope ladder, to rescue the last few stranded people. A booming voice came from the copter

“ Hello there! Grab the ladder carefully and climb up inside”.

The man thought that wasn’t the way he expected the help to come. And he refused. The pilot explained that he won’t be able to come back and he must escape. But our man refused. There will be a boat soon. The helicopter flew away.

The man started praying again. Minutes went by, then an hour. The water has risen to the roof. He is standing facing the sea of water that engulfed all buildings around. He is suddenly panic-stricken. That God wouldn’t help him this time. He started wondering what sins he had committed that God is annoyed with him. The water is rising fast. It’s up to his ankles, then waist and in a few more minutes he was standing with his chest underwater. He held on to the handrails, knowing it’ll all be over in a few minutes. Faces of his wife and son flashed in front of his eyes. And that all his prayers didn’t manage to move God, that was more hurtful. He felt betrayed. With water almost up to his neck, he lets out a desperate howl

“Why dear God did you abandon me? I have always been faithful to you. What have I done wrong? Please help me!“

Suddenly there was a bolt of lightning. And a few more. The dark sky was lit up with electric blue flashes. Then, as our man looked up, the silhouette of a man appeared, and God spoke,

“Fucking idiot, who do you think alerted you of the flood, and sent you the truck, fire engine and the helicopter? I think it’s better to have no followers than blind ones like you!”

He disappeared in the clashing and colliding clouds. The water isn’t rising anymore. The devout man gazed at the sky, awestruck.

“I was right! My lord has saved me again. I saw his face! I’m glad I waited until the very last moment” – he thought.

And then, there was a loud sigh, then out came a big wave, and the man has washed away into nothingness. Even God had had enough of this delusional moron.


Over 17 million people voted for Brexit out of 46 million electorates. Within the first hour of the shocking morning of the 24th June, it was clear that all the promises and dreams of claiming back the glory land were a farce. The first lifeline was the desperate call for a second referendum. The second, the utter chaos that followed in the Tory and UKIP camp, as their bunch of lies came to light one after another. Then there was the High court and the Supreme Court ruling for giving MPs a vote to trigger Article 50. There were options for a soft Brexit with access to the single market and free movement. And then the vote. The final say before it was all over. And it was. Thanks to the deluded 17 million, thanks to the jokers Farage and Boris, thanks to the scheming Daily Mail and Daily Express, and finally thanks to the bloody three-line whip from Corbyn, the fucking show is finally over. There’s no more lifeline; only the grim future with a racist molester as the main ally for the UK. Or possibly the only ally left. The road to perdition starts here…

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